AMA adopts policy to advance gender equity in medicine

(HealthDay)—The American Medical Association (AMA) House of Delegates has adopted a new policy to study, act for, and advocate to advance gender equity in medicine, according to a report published in the association’s AMA Wire.

As part of this action, the House of Delegates pledged to advocate policies that promote transparency in defining criteria for physician compensation; advocate pay structures based on objective, gender-neutral criteria; encourage a specified approach for oversight of compensation models, metrics, and actual total compensation; and advocate training to identify and mitigate implicit bias for those in positions to determine salary and bonuses.

The AMA was also directed to draft a report detailing its positions and recommendations for gender equity in medicine, collect and analyze demographic data on the inclusion of women members, and commit to pay equity across organizations. In order to reduce gender bias, the AMA was directed to recommend elimination of the question of prior salary information from job applications, create an awareness campaign to inform physicians of their rights, establish educational programs to empower all genders to negotiate for equitable compensation; and create guidance relating to transparency of compensation for medical schools and health care facilities.

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Self-control and obesity: Gender matters in children

A toddler’s self-regulation—the ability to change behavior in different social situations—may predict whether he or she will be obese come kindergarten, but the connection appears to be much different for girls than for boys.

Self-regulation is something all children must develop, and poorer self-control in childhood is associated with worse adult health, economic and social outcomes. However, a new study from The Ohio State University found that more self-regulation may not necessarily reduce the risk of obesity, especially in girls.

Girls who scored at either the low or the high end on measures of self-regulation when they were 2 years old were more likely than girls with average self-regulation to be obese at age 5, while boys with high self-regulation were less likely to be obese than their peers with low or average self-regulation, found the study, which appears in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

The difference raises important new questions about the role of gender in the development of childhood obesity, said lead author Sarah Anderson, an associate professor in Ohio State’s College of Public Health.

“Although we tend to assume that more self-regulation is always a positive, it may not be,” she said.

Those seeking answers about how to prevent childhood obesity should be mindful of the possibility that interventions to improve self-regulation might not play out the same way for boys and girls, she said.

“People are trying ways to prevent obesity in young children, and some of those approaches involve improving self-regulation. Our study suggests that could have an unintended impact for some girls,” Anderson said.

“This study leads one to think about how young children are potentially responding differently to messages and expectations based on whether they are boys or girls. We should be cautious about assuming that increases in self-regulation are optimal for everyone.”

The study analyzed data from a nationally representative sample of 6,400 U.S. children born in 2001 to see whether a child’s ability to self-regulate when they were 2 years old was associated with their risk of obesity in kindergarten—and to look for any differences between genders. The data came from the National Center for Education Statistics.

Self-regulation was measured using a four-part in-home assessment that looked at a child’s adaptability, persistence, attention and frustration tolerance. Each child received from one point to five points on each measure, for a possible score of 20—a very high level of self-regulation.

“Observers were looking at things like how readily a child gave up a block when an adult said it was time to play with something else, how difficult it was to hold their attention and how easily frustrated they became when things weren’t going their way,” Anderson said.

“Going in, we thought what many people think—that we would see lower rates of obesity as self-regulation increased.”

But when they looked at their data, in which they separated children into quartiles ranging from “least regulated” to “most regulated,” the researchers found that girls in the least and most self-regulated groups were more likely to be obese at kindergarten age than their female peers in the middle categories.

There was little difference in boys’ risk of obesity except for among the most-regulated, who were least likely to be obese. Obesity was determined by measuring height and weight and defined as a body mass index greater than or equal to the 95th percentile.

“We should not assume that interventions to increase self-regulation will necessarily lead to benefits for both genders—it may be different for boys and girls,” Anderson said

The researchers said there are many ongoing efforts to promote self-regulation in children for a variety of desired outcomes, including obesity prevention and improved school readiness.

In neither gender did the researchers see a clear step-wise pattern where increased self-regulation meant decreased rates of obesity.

Researchers believe that a variety of factors may contribute to links between self-regulation and obesity, including physiological differences and behavioral responses to demands in a child’s environment that could affect appetite, food intake, sleep and activity level.

“Obesity prevention is a complex and humbling task. Gender is another social influence that may affect the success of obesity prevention efforts,” said Anderson’s co-author, Robert Whitaker of Temple University.

This study adds to other obesity research that has found important differences between genders, Anderson said.

“All we can do based on this research is speculate, but it’s possible that girls and boys are reacting differently to social expectations and that could play a role in childhood obesity,” Anderson said.

“If you’re a boy and if the people around you are more OK with you getting easily frustrated and not paying attention, the social stress from your environment may be less than it is for a girl.”

It’s also possible that girls are rewarded more than boys for “good” behavior, propelling them to put themselves under added stress in the interest of appeasing adults, the researchers wrote.

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Gender Bias in Medicine Has Far-Reaching Consequences

FRIDAY, July 13, 2018 — Overlooking women in medicine can have far-reaching consequences, according to a perspective piece published in the June 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Lisa S. Rotenstein, M.D., M.B.A., from Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Anupam B. Jena, M.D., Ph.D., from Harvard Medical School, both in Boston, examined the potential consequences when women in medicine are slighted, overlooked, or explicitly wronged.

The authors note that in academic medicine, harassment remains common; these issues begin early in training, with negative gender-based experiences reported by preclinical medical students. Disparities continue. Male physicians receive significantly greater compensation and recognition than females; over time, these gaps have not decreased significantly. Other, less obvious slights are also prevalent, with female doctors often assumed by patients to be nurses or other types of caregivers and experiencing more disrespect from nonphysician professionals. In terms of clinical care, hospitalized elderly patients have lower 30-day mortality and readmissions when treated by female physicians; similar positive effects on outcomes have been seen for treatment with female surgeons. Female physicians are more likely to deliver guideline-concordant care. The exclusion of women from certain fields such as urology has consequences for the doctor-patient relationship, especially in specialties addressing sensitive topics. En masse, exclusion of women from the upper echelons of medicine may have real implications for patient care.

“Perhaps emphasizing these consequences will bolster efforts to ensure respectful and fair workplaces for female physicians,” the authors write.

Abstract/Full Text

Posted: July 2018

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Turns Out Most Women Want To Foot The Bill On A First Date

Navigating the dating landscape is like entering the depths of uncharted waters. Throw the question of splitting the bill into the mix and you’ve now entered the Bermuda Triangle of first date pitfalls. Goodbye moral compass.

While etiquette tells us we should offer, our feminist principles want us to split it. But then, our dwindling bank balance is praying he’ll foot the bill. So, who should be reaching for their wallet on a first date?

New stats from Badoo (a dating app which has more than 390 million users around the world) have found that the majority of women consider a trip to the ATM part of their pre-date ritual – with 65 per cent of us preferring to pay.

The reason? Confidence. 

According to Badoo psychologist and dating expert Claire Stott, it’s considered one of the “most attractive qualities in a prospective partner.” 

“Women that take initiative and pay for dates exude self-confidence,” she explains. “Equally, men who are confident should find no issue in women who take control in this way. This reinforces each gender’s actions; only unconfident men would see it as a threat.”

In addition, many women don’t want to appear like they’re taking advantage of a potential new beau and are conscious of the financial pressure the dating realm can place on men. 

In short, when it comes to money manners offering is always important – but if your date does insist on covering the cost, don’t scream patriarchy just yet. Instead, reclaim first date awkwardness and see it as an opportunity to cover round two.

Nightcap anyone?

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